Two-bell release system terminated

Students+walk+down+upper+J+hall+on+their+way+to+class.+With+only+one+bell%2C+the+hallways+are+more+crowded++and+it+takes+longer+for+students+to+get+to+class.+

Students walk down upper J hall on their way to class. With only one bell, the hallways are more crowded and it takes longer for students to get to class.

Johnny Marshall

On September 27, the school bell schedule was reverted back to the original format, with a single bell to dismiss all students at once. Previously, there was a first bell to dismiss students in even-numbered rooms followed by a second bell to dismiss students in odd-numbered rooms. The second bell is what former students are used to, as it follows the regular day-to-day schedule.

The two-bell schedule was implemented in the 2020-2021 school year during the hybrid learning format. It was established to keep students separated from each other in the hallways, reducing the spread of COVID-19. Two bells, however, gave some students an eight minute passing period, as opposed to the normal six minute passing period. With eight minutes, students were inadvertently given more time to linger in the hallways and congregate with friends. 

“I think it’s a good thing because first bell and second bell made kids stay in the hallway more,” Sophomore Korren Mason said. 

Now, with the six minute passing period implicated, some students need to be more deliberate with arriving to class on time. With an immediate, single-bell dismissal across the entire school, transition time between classes is reduced, hallway supervision is increased and instructional time is also increased. 

“I think that it is a stupid idea because the hallways are going to get more blocked up and people are going to be late to class,” Junior Carly Stonebreaker said.

Beginning October 4th, the tardy room will open, so students who do not arrive to class in the six minute window will be marked as tardy and sent to the tardy room.